100 minutes tuned to FM

“Every morning I spend one hour and ten minutes in average from Baneasa to Universitatii Square, but it can be worse”, says a partner of a law firm in Bucharest. In the 60 minutes, the lawyer has sufficient time to read the first emails, and even organize his meetings for the day.

In traffic delays, Romanians speak on the cell phone a lot, but the activity itself is difficult to be analyzed compared to other habits that are easier to measure.

In a regular workday, a Bucharest driver listens to the radio in the car 100 minutes in average. The radio’s prime time is made of two timeframes: between 7:00 and 10:00 EET, and in the afternoon between 17:00 and 19:00 EET. In the morning, the drivers stay tuned to their radio in the car approximately 56.4 minutes, in average. When they return from work, drivers keep the radio on for around 49.7 minutes.

Nevertheless, the situation changes in other large cities across the country, where the traffic is easier. In the ten largest cities in the country, with a population of 200,000, the two prime time intervals narrow to 38.6 minutes and 39.1 minutes respectively. “Evidently, the smaller the city, the easier the road traffic, and the time spent behind the wheel reduces accordingly when compared to crowded metropolis”, said Marius Strambeanu, Media Research EDI Romania, the company that holds licenses for Europe FM radio, Radio 21, and Vibe FM.

“Once the road traffic problems are solved in the future, we will witness a reduction in time spent listening to the radio”, Strambeanu added. The listening duration of the radio in the car increased by 5% in the first months of the year compared to the same period in 2008. The majority of the listeners are within the age range of 25-34, predominantly men and listen to commercial radio stations.

In Bucharest, the most popular radio station in prime time is Radio ZU, followed by Kiss FM, Europa FM, and Radio 21. Countrywide, drivers tune in to Europa FM (20.4%), Kiss FM (17.2%), Radio 21 (12.9%) or Radio ZU (12.3%).

Newspapers find their readership in traffic

Another market for which city road traffic is healthy, is newspaper distribution through field forces, a common practice in Bucharest at Adevarul Holding and Ringier.

Through his company, Nimsoc Media, Cosmin Tenu sells newspapers via 40 sellers and 22 stores. The turnover stood at 2.93 million euros and will increase this year as well, as Tenu prepares an expansion in publishing area.

Easier traffic in summer triggers a 30% decline in sales of newspapers and magazines. The most lucrative seasons are spring and fall, when traffic congestion hits sky-high quotas.